Untitled

selected musings on photography

May 3, 2013 at 8:17pm
Looking, and trusting in that act alone, Mishka Henner explores photography as an appropriation artist. Through new and alternative technology, Henner inspects art from the past while innovating in the present. See the project at http://mediastorm.com/clients/2013-icp-infinity-awards-art-mishka-henner

8:16pm
David Goldblatt spent his life documenting apartheid in South Africa. While many photographers chased mass demonstrations and violent rebellions, Goldblatt focused on the cultural values that led to more than 40 years of repression. See the project at http://mediastorm.com/clients/2013-icp-infinity-awards-cornell-capa-lifetime-achievement-david-goldblatt

8:16pm
The idea of an African space program may sound funny to some, but not to Cristina de Middel. Through a mix of fact and fiction, de Middel forces viewers to reinterpret a 1960s space program in Zambia in her photobook, The Afronauts. See the project at http://mediastorm.com/clients/2013-icp-infinity-awards-publication-cristina-de-middel

8:14pm
Surreal and mysterious, North Korea was a black hole to outsiders wanting a glimpse of the country. That all changed in 2012, when AP photographer David Guttenfelder led the opening of the bureau's newest office inside the North Korea. See the project at http://mediastorm.com/clients/2013-icp-infinity-awards-photojournalism-david-guttenfelder

8:13pm
Blurring the line between subjects and friends, Kitra Cahana captures a rare level of intimacy with her subjects. As a documentary photographer, her images explore anthropological, social and spiritual themes through a human perspective. See the project at http://mediastorm.com/clients/2013-icp-infinity-awards-young-kitra-cahana

May 1, 2013 at 2:42am
Reblogged from emptystretch
patrickjoust:

I think photography and literature are both driven by the impulse to show something about life, to give our observations some kind of form. There was a time when I wanted to write. The desire isn’t so strong now, but I can see a connection between it and the role that photography plays in my life. Both involve imposing a narrative onto experience, noticing details, making connections, figuring out what is important or interesting about a situation and trying to put it into a form that makes you feel something. So much of the literature that moves me has a wandering theme. Stories from the road, people on the move, on the run, or looking for something, the recurrence of the familiar amid uncertainty and change. Such work is reflective of the spirit that made it. It carries the charge of life, always moving, always searching. My process is very much about wandering, being out in the world and coming back with pieces of a story that is hopefully held together by the thread of my own sensibility. I don’t know exactly what I will find when I set out, and that is the point. Photography, like writing, is a means of discovery, a filling in of (or working around) blanks, a fleshing out of ideas or feelings.
- Missy Prince
…
read the full Empty Stretch interview
…
emptystretch:

Interview: Missy Prince

patrickjoust:

I think photography and literature are both driven by the impulse to show something about life, to give our observations some kind of form. There was a time when I wanted to write. The desire isn’t so strong now, but I can see a connection between it and the role that photography plays in my life. Both involve imposing a narrative onto experience, noticing details, making connections, figuring out what is important or interesting about a situation and trying to put it into a form that makes you feel something. So much of the literature that moves me has a wandering theme. Stories from the road, people on the move, on the run, or looking for something, the recurrence of the familiar amid uncertainty and change. Such work is reflective of the spirit that made it. It carries the charge of life, always moving, always searching. My process is very much about wandering, being out in the world and coming back with pieces of a story that is hopefully held together by the thread of my own sensibility. I don’t know exactly what I will find when I set out, and that is the point. Photography, like writing, is a means of discovery, a filling in of (or working around) blanks, a fleshing out of ideas or feelings.

- Missy Prince

read the full Empty Stretch interview

emptystretch:

Interview: Missy Prince

(via photographsonthebrain)

April 24, 2013 at 7:20pm
Reblogged from thephotographicimage

I’ve fallen in love with photographs that occupy this gray area between mistake and ‘useful’ photography. I usually venture out with the intention of making a traditional photograph, either portrait or landscape that’s effective in telling a story or reaching an audience that can understand it. Instead, I often end up with images where the language is broken and the narrative is non-existent. By sequencing these one-offs, or mistakes, together in a series, it creates confusion (not intentionally), and elicits a response that is unlike the expected. For me, photo-journalism has the same problem. Photography is almost never factual, but it’s there as an aid our understanding of a fact.

—  Sean Stewart. Read more: Interview with Sean Stewart on ilovethatphoto.net. (via thephotographicimage)

(via photographsonthebrain)

April 22, 2013 at 7:40pm
Reblogged from cascade-collective

cascade-collective:

Grant Harder

7:39pm
Reblogged from natgeofound
natgeofound:

Muscles ripple as an Arabian steed rears above its trainer in Jordan, December 1964.Photograph by Luis Marden, National Geographic

natgeofound:

Muscles ripple as an Arabian steed rears above its trainer in Jordan, December 1964.Photograph by Luis Marden, National Geographic

7:33pm
Reblogged from artnet
artnet:

Rauschenberg
“The artist’s job is to be a witness to his time in history.” - Robert Rauschenberg 
Over the course of his career, Rauschenberg was called by turns a Minimalist, a Conceptualist, a neo-Dadaist, and a forerunner of Pop. Pictured is his 1967 work, Test Stone #1. 

artnet:

Rauschenberg

“The artist’s job is to be a witness to his time in history.” - Robert Rauschenberg 

Over the course of his career, Rauschenberg was called by turns a Minimalist, a Conceptualist, a neo-Dadaist, and a forerunner of Pop. Pictured is his 1967 work, Test Stone #1.